C + le (Consonant plus le) – Phonics the Easy Way

C + le (Consonant plus le) – Phonics the Easy Way

The last phonics pattern is C + le.  Unlike the other patterns that often occur in one syllable words, C + le only happens in two syllable or more words.  That is why this is always the last pattern that I teach to kids.

 

Up to this point, when I have come across the C + le pattern I may have added it to the chart, but I have just told the child how to read the word if she was struggling with it.  Let’s take a look at a closed pattern and C + le pattern word like, “bubble.”  The child may come to this word and not be able to read it.  To get her started draw a line after bub/ like this or straight up and down line.  Then ask her what pattern this is.  Reading the first part may be all that she needs to easily figure out that this word is bubble.  Some kids are really good at using context to help them figure out words.  If you haven’t introduced the C + le pattern yet, then tell the child that the second part is /bul/ and have her put both of the syllables together.

 

Once the child is ready to learn about the C + le pattern you can go to your chart and look at the syllable word parts that you have collected.  Your chart may look something like this.

 

Closed

Open

Silent E

Bossy R

Two Vowels

C + le

-tle

-ble

-gle

 

You may notice that there is a dash before the pattern.  This is because this pattern will only happen at the end of a word.  There will be another pattern that comes before it.  All of the patterns except for Silent E have the possibility of being combined with the C + le pattern.  Each of these parts will go in the designated area on the chart.  Not the whole word.  Remember this is a vowel syllable chart.  Having the whole word mumble under the closed pattern is confusing to the child because the –ble belongs under the C + le pattern.

 

Here is an example of what a chart with each of the patterns would look like for the following words.

 

  1. Jiggle
  2. cattle
  3. hassle
  4. bub
  5. bible
  6. table
  7. bugle
  8. staple
  9. purple
  10. startle
  11. gargle
  12. eagle
  13. beagle
  14. noodle

 

Closed

jig

cat

has

bub

Open

Bi

table

bu

sta

Silent E

Bossy R

Pur

Star

gar

Two Vowels

Talkers

Ea

bea

Whiners

noo

C + le

-tle

-ble

-gle

-sle

-ple

-dle

 

Now that the chart is filled out you can take a close look and notice what is happening with C + le pattern.  Remind the child how to read each of these patterns if they do not remember how to pronounce it.  Then, ask the child what she notices about this pattern.  She may notice that they all end in e and that you cannot hear the e sound.  She may notice that they all end in the /ul/ sound.  Use the information that the child gives you and simply acknowledge if they are right.  After the child has finished making observations about the pattern you can introduce her to the rule.

 

Whenever there is an –le at the end of a word it is going to grab the consonant before it.  The consonant is going to make the –le say /u/. 

 

Many children will look at the c + le pattern and think that the pattern only exists if there is a c before it.  If this happens simply let the child know that the C stands for consonant and review what the consonants are.  One way to explain consonants is to say, “Consonants are all of the letters of the alphabet that are not vowels.”

 

Take a look at a video clip where I am introducing the C + le pattern.

 

Comments

  1. Joanne, I’m visiting from the UBC again. Your expertise boggles me! You explain things that I did not know could be explained! A great post–so clear.
    Kebba Buckley Button recently posted..UpBeat Living: Maintain Your Alkaline Balance (pH) to Prevent DiseaseMy Profile

  2. Great lesson – thank you. I am a former Reading Specialist (now college prof.). I’m currently remember these phonics lessons as I teach my youngest to read.

  3. Ha ha! I was so confused until I read your explanation of what the C stood for! I know these are such difficult words to spell, so they must be hard to read, too. Thanks for a concise explanation.
    Amy Kinnaird recently posted..Create an Email Signature that Catches ClientsMy Profile

  4. Nice job explaining this concept to parents. Providing information that help parents help their child help themselves is priceless.

    Kim

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